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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This emerging topic conference occurred on October 1st and 2nd, 2022. After completing this activity, you should be able to: 1. Understand the disease burden of ALD and its current and future pharmacological treatments. 2. Recognize the unmet need of multidisciplinary care of ALD patients with hepatology and addiction teams. 3. Understand the status and emerging trends on the role of early liver transplant in patients with life-threatening ALD, including severe AH.

    Alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) is the leading indication for liver related morbidity, mortality and need for liver transplantation. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a severe form of ALD with a high short-term mortality. This ETC combines the ALD and Liver Transplant Surgery SIGs to develop a combined one and half day program to discuss emerging trends and updates on the disease burden, current treatment options, and future therapies with a focus on updates on early liver transplantation for ALD and AH.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The emerging topic conference occurred on October 1st & 2nd, 2022. After completing this activity, you should be able to: • Define and list disparities that are present in chronic liver disease and liver transplantation. • Construct and design strategies around palliative care implementation in chronic liver disease management. • Develop and present strategies to eliminate disparities in chronic liver disease management.

    There has been increasing national awareness of systemic racism and oppression of communities of color in the United States. Systemic racism negatively impacts health outcomes and has also played a role in decreased access to specialty care, liver transplant waitlist, receipt of liver transplantation and post-transplant outcomes. Patients of color are disproportionately less likely to be listed for liver transplant or to undergo transplantation. This webinar is intended to increase awareness of the barriers patients experience in the liver transplant process and propose strategies to increase access to liver transplant.

  • Contains 9 Component(s)

    Recordings from the AASLD/EASL NAFLD Nomenclature Consensus Conference can be accessed here. The conference took place July 8-9, 2022 in Chicago, IL and virtually.

    Recordings from the AASLD/EASL NAFLD Nomenclature Consensus Conference can be accessed here. The conference took place July 8-9, 2022 in Chicago, IL and virtually.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 2 Component(s)

    Webinar hosted by the Clinical Practice Special Interest Group on Thursday, September 15, 2022.

    Ascites is a common complication and often the first sign of decompensation in patients with End-Stage Liver Disease. Management of ascites is often fraught with complex challenges including electrolyte imbalances, renal failure, hepatic encephalopathy, and significant utilization of resources. A proportion of the patients do not respond to conventional diuretic therapy (refractory ascites) or develop significant side effects that limit the diuretics' optimal dosing, leading to suboptimal control of ascites ( intractable ascites). This webinar will review recent advances in managing refractory/intractable ascites.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Webinar hosted by the Clinical Practice Special Interest Group on Thursday, July 14, 2022.

    Management of autoimmune hepatitis is often quite complex, especially for those not achieving remission with conventional immunosuppression. This webinar aims to review current and upcoming pharmacological treatment options in the management of these special groups of patients.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 7 Component(s)

    The purpose of the AASLD/EASL HBV Endpoints Conference is to bring together the academic, regulatory, pharmaceutical communities and patients’ advocacy groups to discuss therapeutic endpoints, trial designs appropriate patient populations and safety concerns with regards to novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of chronic hepatitis B and D.

    The purpose of the AASLD/EASL HBV Endpoints Conference is to bring together the academic, regulatory, pharmaceutical communities and patients’ advocacy groups to discuss therapeutic endpoints, trial designs appropriate patient populations and safety concerns with regards to novel therapeutic approaches for treatment of chronic hepatitis B and D. The HBV therapeutic field is at a crossroads with many different approaches being considered but numerous regulatory issues, trial design issues and safety issues need to be addressed. This meeting will be unique in that it will bring all the important and relevant parties to the table to discuss these critical issues that will need to be resolved before substantial progress can be made in delivering the next generation of therapeutic agents to affected individuals with chronic hepatitis B and D.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 2 Component(s)

    Joint webinar organized by the AASLD and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN).

    There has been a recent worldwide identification, first from the United Kingdom then globally including the United States, of an unidentified pathogen leading to a plausible increase in cases of severe acute hepatitis in children. Some of these cases have been linked to Adenovirus Type 41, but many questions remain. Of the important etiopathogenesis questions the following will be posed, specifically: 1)Are these cases an increase over prior years? 2) Are these cases all related to the same pathogen? 3)Is there any possible connection to SARSCov2 past infections?

    These and other similarly topical, time-sensitive, and relevant questions will be addressed by this joint webinar organized by the AASLD and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN).

  • Product not yet rated Contains 1 Component(s)

    Webinar hosted by the AASLD COVID-19 Task Force's Clinical Oversight and Education Subcommittee on Wednesday, April 13.

    The AASLD COVID-19 Task Force's Clinical Oversight and Education Subcommittee presents a new installment in its popular COVID-19 and the Liver webinar series. We will begin by covering the therapeutics and pathways to treat outpatients with COVID-19. This will be followed by an overview of the epidemiology of transplant donors and recipients with COVID-19 and an open discussion with a distinguished panel of experts. The expert roundtable discussion will cover the difficult issues surrounding the management of liver transplant donors and recipients who test positive for SARS-CoV-2. Are we using enough of these controversial organs or are we taking unreasonable risks? What really is the risk of donor to recipient disease transmission? What other issues do we need to consider before we accept a SARS-CoV-2 positive donor or recipient? Bring your questions and challenge the panel or just listen in to this exciting and informative webinar.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/15/2022

    Webinar hosted by the Portal Hypertension: Clinical and Experimental Special Interest Group on Tuesday, March 15, 2022.

    This webinar will address endovascular management of portal hypertensive complications using TIPS. Speakers will assess evidence for the use of TIPS in the setting of portal and mesenteric vein thromboses and how this may impact portal HTN, survival, as well as transplant outcomes. Speakers will also discuss the standard and emerging indications for TIPS as well as future directions for TIPS management in portal HTN.

    Virginia Hernandez-Gea

    Virginia Hernández-Gea, MD, PhD is a interventional hepatologist at the liver unit at hospital clinic. She is fully dedicated to the management of patients with portal hypertension and vascular liver diseases as well as conducting liver catheterization procedures including TIPS. She also runs a translational laboratory focused on the understanding of the role of the liver endothelium in liver diseases.

    Dr. Hernández-Gea is a member of the EASL Governing Board and author of more than 120 publications. She has serves as editorial boar member of Hepatology and Liver international. She is currently member of the Portal Hypertension Special Interest Group for the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), Secretary of VALDIG  (Vascular Liver Disease Interest Group) and faculty of Baveno. As an active teacher and educator, she has directed 5 doctoral thesis and is assistant professor at the university of Barcelona.

    Riad Salem

    Riad Salem, MD, MBA is Professor of Radiology, Surgery and Medicine, Vice-Chair, Image-Guided Therapy and Section Chief, Interventional Radiology in the Department of Radiology at Northwestern University in Chicago. His areas of interest include the use of image-guided techniques for the treatment of liver cancer including chemoembolisation, bland embolization and radioembolisation. He is a graduate of McGill University in Montreal, where he was recipient of the Wood Gold Medal and J Francis Award in Internal Medicine. He then completed his residency in Washington DC, a fellowship in interventional radiology (University of Pennsylvania), as well as a Master’s in Business Administration (Finance).

    Dr. Salem is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society and a Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology. He has delivered >800 lectures nationally and internationally, and written extensively on the subject of interventional oncology and portal hypertension (TIPS), with over 370 publications, 28000 citations, and an h index of 92. His current research focus on: 1) hepatocellular carcinoma advances in minimally invasive therapies, 2) imaging methodologies following locoregional treatment, and 3) treatment of portal vein thrombosis in cirrhotics and non-cirrhotic using novel TIPS techniques, with conversion of untransplantable patients to transplant candidacy. He serves as PI of two, international, randomized phase III trials involving sorafenib +/- Y90 in HCC (STOP-HCC) and chemotherapy +/- Y90 in CRC (EPOCH); EPOCH was the first large-scale RCT to meet its endpoints in the field of interventional oncology. He was also lead investigator in LEGACY, the pivotal trial that lead to the FDA’s first PMA device approval.

    Elizabeth Verna (Moderator)

    Elizabeth Verna, MD, MS is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation and Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases at Columbia University, where she practices as transplant hepatologist. In addition, Dr. Verna has an active clinical research program in end-stage liver disease and liver transplantation and is the Director of Clinical Research for the Columbia University Transplant Clinical Research Center.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/23/2022

    Webinar hosted by the Inclusion and Diversity Committee on Wednesday, February 23.

    The purpose of this webinar is to discuss action items for the AASLD and academic institutions. These action items will focus on efforts to improve diversity, equity and inclusion in all aspects of the hepatology continuum, including the hepatology work force as well as racial disparities in hepatology care. The webinar will include a formal 10-minute overview of the concepts of diversity, equity and inclusion and another 10-minute formal presentation on proposed future directions outlined in the white paper. There will then be a 20-minute moderated discussion between panelist discussing perceived and actual barriers to these action items. The webinar will conclude with a 10-minute question and answer portion involving all faculty.

    Be sure to check out the additional resources in the Handouts section.

    Miguel H. Malespin

    Miguel H. Malespin M.D. is a transplant hepatologist at Tampa General Hospital and associate professor for the University of South Florida College of Medicine. He earned his medical degree at Ponce Health Sciences University in Puerto Rico. Dr. Malespin continued his training in internal medicine and gastroenterology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He then completed a fellowship in transplant hepatology at Loyola University Medical Center. His areas of clinical and research interest include non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and health disparities. He is an active member of the AGA and AASLD serving in multiple roles and committees.

    Carla W. Brady

    Carla Brady, MD, MHS, FAASLD is an Associate Professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at Duke University Medical Center, having been a faculty member within the division since 2006. She is a transplant hepatologist and has a particular interest in liver disease and liver transplantation from a women's health perspective. Dr. Brady is the author of manuscripts on and has given talks locally, regionally, and nationally on liver disease in pregnancy, pregnancy in transplant patients, liver disease and liver transplantation in menopausal women, and disparities in liver disease care. As an active member of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), she has served on its Scientific Program Committee and Nominating Committee. She has also served as chair of the AASLD Program Evaluation Committee and as chair of the AASLD Inclusion and Diversity Committee. Locally, she has served as an elected member of the Executive Committee of the Academic Council of Duke University, a steering committee member for the Duke University Academic Council Diversity Task Force and as a co-chair of its subcommittee on Best Practices in Faculty and Administrative Diversity. 

    Lauren D. Nephew (Moderator)

    Lauren D. Nephew, MD, MA, MSCE is Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Indiana University School of Medicine.  Her research interests include understanding barriers to liver transplantation for vulnerable populations, disparities in care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and the impact of the social and structural determinants of health on the outcomes of patients with liver disease. Dr. Nephew’s clinical work focuses on both decompensated liver disease patients being evaluated for liver transplantation as well as patients with chronic liver disease.  She is the chair of the Intersociety Group on Diversity and the chair of the AASLD Inclusion and Diversity Committee.

    Dr. Nephew attended medical school at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University.  She completed residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and Gastroenterology and Liver Transplantation Fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania. While at Case Western Reserve University, Dr. Nephew completed a Masters program in Clinical Bioethics.   While at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Nephew completed a Masters of Science in Clinical Epidemiology.  Dr. Nephew is a health equity champion, wife, and mother of two. 

    Naudia L. Jonassaint

    Naudia L. Jonassaint, MD, MHS currently is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is currently serving as the Vice Chair of the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Department of Medicine and the Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs in School of Medicine. Dr. Jonassaint has a specific interest in disparate outcomes in liver disease and is also uniquely interested in diversity and inclusion in academic training.

    Dr. Jonassaint is currently serving on the Finance Committee for the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) as well as serving on the editorial board for Liver Transplantation. Her collaborative research focuses the optimization of care for pre-transplant liver patients including transplant selection in addition to a focus on disparities in liver transplant outcomes. As an active teacher and educator, she has mentored many undergraduate, graduate and medical students as well as junior faculty and staff at the University of Pittsburgh and beyond.  

    Sonali Paul

    Sonali Paul is a transplant hepatologist and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago. She is also the director of the Metabolic and Fatty Liver clinic. She has an interest in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity medicine, organ allocation, health disparities, and shared decision making between patients and providers. She received an MD from Tufts University School of Medicine. She completed her internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and returned to Tufts for her fellowship training in gastroenterology. She also earned an MS in clinical and translational science from the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University. She completed an advanced hepatology fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in 2016 and joined the University of Chicago faculty shortly thereafter. 

    Laurie D. DeLeve

    Laurie D. DeLeve, MD, PhD, FAASLD has been on the faculty at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles since 1990 and is Professor of Medicine and Vice Chair for Scientific Affairs in the Department of Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine. She received her MD at the Erasmus University of Rotterdam in the Netherlands and her PhD at the University of Toronto in Canada. She did her training in Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, followed by a fellowship in Gastroenterology/Hepatology at UCLA. Dr. DeLeve is a physician-scientist and is involved in patient care, basic research, and education of medical student, residents, and Fellows.

    Dr DeLeve’s NIH-funded research has focused on the biology and pathobiology of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). Early work from her laboratory demonstrated that LSECs were the initial target in sinusoidal obstruction syndrome and these studies provided significant insight into the mechanisms of this syndrome. Subsequent research examined the role of LSECs in other forms of liver injury. Dr DeLeve’s lab demonstrated that LSECs maintain hepatic stellate cell quiescence, that LSEC capillarization prior to fibrosis is permissive for hepatic stellate cell activation and why that is so.  In recent years, Dr. DeLeve’s lab was the first to identify resident and bone marrow sinusoidal endothelial cell progenitor cells, so-called bone marrow sprocs. Her laboratory has examined the role of bone marrow sprocs in acute and chronic liver injury.